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People often ask me two questions. The first is: Did you make these chocolate chip cookies yourself? I reply, Yes, with an appropriate amount of honesty. The second question is: Can I have the recipe? My answer is, Yes, you can have what is probably the best chocolate chip recipe in the world.

The ingredients are listed in a mix of American and British measurements, so you might need to use this.

Get a big bowl, and put this stuff in it:

Mix them all up. Don’t taste it yet; it’s too slimy and gloopy.

Now add this stuff:

Mix again. Tasting is good to do now.

Chop up 300 g of really good chocolate, 2/3 milk chocolate and 1/3 70% cocoa plain chocolate. If you are living in North America and you are tempted to use chocolate chips or anything that has Hershey’s written on the label, resist. Put the chocolate in the bowl and mix one last time.

Grab some dough, make a ball and put it on an ungreased baking sheet. Repeat about 35 times. Bake all those little balls for about 9 minutes at 190°C.

Eat all that you can within a couple hours. Store the leftovers in an airtight container.

Your results may vary.

You’re welcome.


24 February 2015

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This one red chilli sauce will help you find true love

Everybody needs some good sauces in the their cooking repertoire. Red chilli sauce is a major thing in Southwestern/Mexican cooking. This one at least as good if not better than what you get at one of my Tucson favourites La Parilla Suiza. The recipe is from my most used cookbook Jane Butel’s Southwestern Kitchen. (You can get it from this link for less than a fiver. This is probably the best investment you will make all week.)

Jane Butel's Red Chilli Sauce recipe

Some notes:

I think you will find that you truly love it.


31 August 2014
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Cooking tips 3: blending

You know how blenders take up space on your counter and get dusty and when you actually do decide to blend something the 45 minutes you spend cleaning it afterwards reminds you of why you never use your blender and then something breaks and the replacement part is more expensive than buying a whole new blender?

Immersion blenders solve all these problems. Plus they are fun to use. Christine bought this one for £4.13 (!!!) not long ago. We like it and use it a lot.


30 January 2014
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Cooking tips 2: burgers

Next time you have burgers, fry some thinly sliced carrots with your onions. The extra bit of sweetness and flavour is actually perfect.


27 January 2014
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Cooking tips 1: introduction

Now that I’m halfway through my final year of a culinary arts degree, I would like to spend a few days writing about cooking. I don’t know much about cooking – it’s more a restaurant management degree than a chef’s degree – but I really like to cook and I really like to eat. I think I’ve stumbled across some useful things over the last few years, both at home and in the college kitchens. I think you might like to know what those few things are. I will be offering them daily until I run out as short little posts, similar to my Creativity series. I will write about cooking in general, about equipment and about how to cook some specific things. Maybe some of it will be new to you. There will be at least one technique that I think I invented. Also, you can add tips in the comments. Onwards…

Cooking is like any other creative endeavour, the better you understand your medium the more freely you are able to create. Recipes are really helpful. I use them all the time. But once you start thinking about what’s going on in a recipe and why and how you can adapt it to better suit your tastes and circumstances, then you are properly starting to cook. I learned this from my wife Christine and from Nigel Slater’s Appetite. If you want to get past recipe following and learn how to really think about food, Appetite is an excellent place to start. If you live in the UK, your library probably has a copy.

Appetite by Nigel Slater


26 January 2014
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